Landscape

Anton Smit Sculpture Park

Entrance to Anton Smit Gallery is guarded by these sentinels

Entrance to Anton Smit Gallery is guarded by these sentinels

The ILASA year end function was held at the Anton Smit Sculpture Park in Bronkhorstspruit and included a guided walk through the gallery and production area, followed by a lunch at the tea garden called Imagine Cafe.

The Gallery

The Gallery

Anton was in the Cape over this time so the tour was led by his dynamic wife Roelien who gave us insight into the working of the gallery and Anton’s thought process in creating artworks. The gallery exudes creativity and Roelien made us all feel welcome by sharing her knowledge and introducing us to the team members of the business.

The ILASA group is given a tour of how the sculptures are made

The ILASA group is given a tour of how the sculptures are made

Roelien explained that almost all of Anton’s sculptures are connected to the human body and relate to the human mind and soul. His work includes heads and monumental statues that evoke themes of suffering, reconciliation and glory and can be connected to his strong religious beliefs. He is also known for his nudes, masks, hands, angels, warriors and abstract works, using mostly steel, fibreglass and bronze.

Something beautiful at every angle

Something beautiful at every angle

The Sculpture Park allows you to get up close to the artworks

The Sculpture Park allows you to get up close to the artworks

The Sculpture Park consists of an assorted collection of his work placed in a garden setting with a bacdrop of natural limestone fomations. The largest of the sculptures can be seen when driving into the parking area and one can wander down to see these more closely. I especially liked exploring the garden and seeing a sculpture placed in a viewpoint, framed by trees, that one moved towards.

It is all about experience. What I love about his sculptures is that you can move around them, touch them and experience them from multiple angles.

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Highly emotive, grand scale pieces welcome you to the Sculpture Park

Highly emotive, grand scale pieces welcome you to the Sculpture Park

The sculpture park is open to public, it can be accessed anytime, however the art gallery is only open during office hours Monday – Friday | 9am – 5pm, Saturday / Sunday | 9am – 1pm. For more info please visit https://www.antonsmit.co.za

Masks on the Wall

Masks on the Wall

Vergelegen

You know you have arrived somewhere special when you drive down the oak tree lined driveway and approach the entrance gate to Vergelegen Estate. This historic farm was granted to Governer Willem Adriaan van der Stel in 1700. Here he built an estate that reflected the Renaissance influence of wealthy estates and palaces in Europe with their symmetrical plans and ornate gardens. Vergelegen was laid out with a double walled octagonal garden, radial avenues, and four flanking outbuildings - the slave lodge, water mill/stable, the wine cellar and the pigeon house. 

Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen

I enjoyed exploring the octagonal garden - especially the pergola covered walkway along the perimeter. The compacted earth walkway has been overgrown with moss in some areas. To see an artist who creates beautiful sculptures that change over time as moss and fungi grow on them, see Mirella Bandini's work: http://iconosquare.com/mirellabandini

With landscape it's about what defines the space you are in: what is above you (pergola with wisteria or bougainvilla creeper) what is below you (moss covered walkway) what is around you (wall to one side, Plectranthus and Azaleas on the other). Designing a garden is like designing a house because you experience it spatially; instead of a roof over your head you have a tree canopy, instead of walls you have planting in the form of shrubs or hedges. Flooring is important - is the surface you walk on rough or smooth? Does it make a noise like gravel? The biggest and most exciting difference between a building and a garden is the seasonal variation - how does foliage and light change with the seasons? What colour variations are there as different plants start flowering?

Vergelegen Manor House
Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen
Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen
Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen

There is so much to see on this beautiful estate! The Contemplation Garden is lovely and adjacent to the oldest living Oak Tree. We did the Yellowwood Walk which must be really impressive when all the Camellias are in flower - I didn't realise you got so many different hybrids. The view of the stream is very pretty here. The Rose Garden is a sensory delight. The Wetland Garden is lovely, but is quickly forgotten as you enter the spectacular Camphor Forest! You feel as if you could be in an Enid Blighton novel as you walk through this enchanted landscape. The trees are truly inspiring. I can't imagine having a picnic in a more beautiful place.

Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen
Oldest Oak Tree
Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen
Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen
Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen
Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen

Enough about the gardens... The manor house has a passageway dedicated to the history of the estate and it was fascinating to read about the changes over the last 300 years. I was especially intrigued with the notable references to slavery. 

Sprout Landscapes visits Vergelegen

One of the things I am most grateful for, as a South African, is my Freedom. My heart ached as I read the names of the slaves that were purchased for van der Stel and I tried to imagine what some of their lives must have been like. Can you imagine not owning your freedom? Can you imagine being owned by somebody, doing hard labour every day, never leaving the farm you work on, being deprived of ambition and hope? And then I read on... Unnamed from the Cape, Aged 1...Unnamed from the Cape, Aged 2.

Slave Record at Vergelegen

Where did these tiny unnamed children come from? What happened to their parents and what became of them? Looking into the past has an unsatisfying way of making you curious about the details, but knowing that you will probably never know the full story. Vergelegen has a vast and rich history and a visit to this special estate is a rich and rewarding experience.

Karoo National Park

On our way to Cape Town we stayed over in Beaufort West and went into the Karoo National Park for a few hours in the late afternoon. Day visitors pay R40 pp (RSA citizens).

sprout landscapes visits karoo national park

Some interesting history about the park from the brochure: "During the late 1950s a local farmer William Quinton campaigned for a conservation area in the Beaufort West vicinity. However, it was only in the 1970s that the South African National Parks proposed the establishment of a National Park that would be representative of the Nama Karoo Biome after a campaign launched by the South African Nature Foundation and funded through the commission and sale of special art stamps, depicting the flora and fauna of the Great Karoo,"

I asked the ranger at the gate if there were actually lions in the reserve, and he proudly told me that there were indeed; eleven in fact. Considering the size of the park (just under 90 000 hectares) we realised our chances of spotting one were slim! Game is not abundant in this reserve (we saw 1x Gemsbok, 1x Kudu, 1x Red Hartebeest and some Klipspringer in our two hour stay) but this is a reserve you visit more for the landscape and experience rather than for animal spotting.

One such experience is driving up Klipspringer Pass: the road that snakes its way up the mountain is constructed with a beautiful, curving stone packed retaining wall. It is reminiscient of the Zimbabwe ruins and is quite beautiful to see. I wonder how long it took to construct?

sprout landscapes visits karoo national park
sprout landscapes stone wall klipsringer pass

There are lovely birds to see (more than 200 spp). Apparently the Park boasts one of the largest concentrations of breeding pairs of Verraux's Eagles (Black Eagles) in the country. We were fortunate enough to spot a pair soaring over Klipspringer Gorge Look out Point.

We didn't stay over in the park, but the beautiful Cape Dutch style self-catering units look picturesque with expansive views over the Karoo landscape. The campsite looked very inviting with lots of vegetation and grass as well as good facilities - we will have to come camp here one day! Visit www.sanparks.org to check availability or make a booking.

sprout landscapes visits karoo national park

I didn't have high expectations for the the 300m Fossil Walk, but we decided to do it before heading back to town. The slightly raised stone pathway (wheelchair accessible) was beautiful: clean and smooth as it weaved its way through the golden grasses and Karoo scrub. I appreciated that plants were given name tags every few metres and the fossil boards were very informative. I have to admit that I am not all that excited about animals that lived and died millions of years ago, but I really enjoyed the walk because you get to experience the landscape and feel part of the nature that you are in. And isn't that we we are looking for when we go someone different: experience the place you are visiting, connect with the beauty around you.

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sprout landscapes visits karoo national park
sprout landscapes visits karoo national park
sprout landscapes visits karoo national park